Vegetarian Entrees

 

 

Lentil Dahl 

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Description:
India has a rich, vegetarian heritage, rooted in 5000-year-old traditions. Dahl, translates into soup, which is commonly prepared with lentils, making this rich and thick meal common to households and restaurants alike. Serve this dish by itself or over a bed of brown rice.

The Health Benefits of lentils are that they are very rich in protein (about 26%), folic acid, and both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber. Lentils are also very high in Vitamin C and the B vitamins, and contain eight of the essential amino acids. They also contain many trace minerals. Lentils are one of the highest sources of antioxidants found in winter growing legumes.
The soluble fiber in lentils also helps eliminate cholesterol, since it binds to it, reducing blood cholesterol levels. There is also evidence to prove that lentils can slow the liver's manufacture of cholesterol, which similarly helps to reduce levels in the body.
Lentils for Weight Loss
Because insoluble fiber is indigestible and passes through the body virtually intact, it provides few calories. And since the digestive tract can handle only so much bulk at a time, fiber-rich foods are more filling than other foods, so people tend to eat less.


Ingredients:
1 tbsp olive oil
½ onion diced
½ cup carrots diced
½ cup celery diced
2 minced cloves of garlic
2 tsp minced peeled ginger
1-2 tsp curry powder
½ tsp cumin powder
2 ½ cups vegetable stock or water (Low salt optional)
1 cup brown or green lentils, rinsed
¼ tsp pepper
Salt to taste


Directions:

Sauté onions, carrots, celery, garlic and ginger in oil, over medium heat for 3-5 minutes or until onions are soft.

Add curry and cumin and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring constantly to avoid scorching the spices.

Stir in stock and lentils and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45-50 minutes or until lentils are soft.

Add salt to taste.

Serve over brown rice to make this a complete protein meal.


Servings: 2 - 4


Notes: This recipe is from the Wild Rose Herbal D-Tox Program Submitted by: Shannon Bliss, CNP, ROHP, RNCP, Certified Nutritional Practitioner and Certified Live Cell Microscopist. Kelowna 250-801-2798


Special Diet: Vegetarian, Low Sodium, Low Fat, High Protein, High Fibre, Low Calorie


Category: Vegetarian Entrees

Submitted By: Shannon Bliss



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Portobello Mushroom, Goat Cheese and Walnut Sliders
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Description: This bite-size mushroom burger makes a tasty meat-free option at summer barbecues.
Portobello mushrooms, sometimes also spelled portabella, are actually the same species as a crimini mushroom. Generally, the mushroom is called a crimini when small and a portabello when its cap has grown to about four to six inches in diameter. These large brown mushrooms have a meaty texture and can be grilled, roasted or used as an ingredient in other dishes.
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