Vegetarian Entrees

 

 

How to Steam Vegetables 

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Description:
When I sit down to prepare my meals, I know for certain that vegetables will always find their way onto my table. Although I like to grill vegetables, steaming them is one of my preferred methods. By steaming a vegetable, its color, texture, and flavor is better retained, as is the vegetable’s nutritional content. Steaming is also one of the easiest ways to prepare vegetables, and can be done in minutes.


Ingredients:
You do not need any special equipment. Most people will have a saucepan, lid, and colander already in their kitchen, and that is all that is needed for steaming on a stovetop. Try to choose vegetable that are in season.


Directions:
Fill the pot with enough water so that is just barely reaches the bottom of the colander or steamer basket. Once the water comes to a boil, add vegetables and place a loose fitting lid on top to cover. If your lid is more fitted over the colander, position it so that one side hangs over the colander just enough to let the steam escape.

All vegetables will have different cooking times depending on their size and thickness. Below you will find some of the more commonly steamed vegetables and their cooking times for both stovetop.

Asparagus:
On the stovetop, asparagus are steamed approximately four minutes for thin spears. Add an extra minute or two for thicker spears.

Broccoli:
Broccoli florets are steamed on the stovetop about five minutes. Look for a dark color change and you will know when the broccoli is done.

Brussels Sprouts:
On the stovetop, Brussels spouts are steamed approximately ten minutes.

Carrots:
Carrots that are sliced about ¼” thick are steamed on the stovetop about six to eight minutes.


Cauliflower:
Cauliflower florets will steam on the stovetop in about six minutes.

Green Beans:
Steam green beans on the stovetop for about five minutes.

Peas:
Peas steamed on the stovetop take about three minutes.

Zucchini:
On the stovetop, steam zucchini for six to seven minutes.


Notes: Remember to add some good oil, like olive oil to bring out the flavour and also so your body can absorb and utilize the nutrients from your favorite vegetables.


Special Diet: Vegetarian, Low Fat, High Fibre, Low Calorie


Category: Vegetarian Entrees

Submitted By: OK In Health



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