Soup

 

 

Crockpot Red Lentil Quinoa Soup 

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Description:
This hearty low fat crockpot quinoa soup recipe combines quinoa with red lentils and veggies, for a simple but satisfying vegetarian or vegan main dish soup recipe. Vary the veggies to your taste





Ingredients:
1/2 cup quinoa
3/4 cup small red lentils (masoor dhal)
Optional: 1 Tbsp olive oil
2 large carrots
2 stalks celery
1 small head cauliflower OR 2 medium potatoes or OR 1 med. zucchini OR 1 small butternut squash
1 bay leaf
2 inch piece cinnamon stick
2 thin slices fresh ginger
1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded
6 cups water or unsalted soup stock
1/2 tsp gr cumin
1/2 tsp gr fennel seed
1/2 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp gr coriander
1/2 tsp dried thyme leaf or 1 sprig fresh
1 tsp dried basil or 1 Tbsp minced fresh
1/4 tsp dried rosemary leaves or 1 sprig fresh
1 tsp salt or to taste and fresh ground black pepper
4 Tbsp minced fresh herbs: parsley, cilantro or basil
2 cups chopped fresh greens: kale, chard, or spinach
More Heat: Add 1/2 - 1 tsp green curry paste OR 1/4 tsp cayenne powder


Directions:
Rinse the quinoa and red lentils in a bowl or pan, then drain into a colander
Peel the carrots, slice lengthwise, then slice in thin pieces
Wash and trim the celery stalks, then slice crosswise in thin pieces
Break or cut the cauliflower into large chunks - these will break up into smaller pieces as they cook
Combine olive oil, quinoa, lentils, herbs & spices, fresh ginger and jalapeno in the crockpot
Add the vegetables, except for the optional greens, and cover with the 6 cups water
Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or more if needed
20 minutes before serving, turn the heat up to high and stir in optional greens
Just before serving, add the minced fresh parsley, basil or cilantro, salt & pepper, and serve, removing the ginger slices, bay leaves, cinnamon stick, as you come across them


Nutrient Information:
Nutrition Info for 1 Serving, 116 g: 129 calories, 23 g carbohydrate, 1 g fat, 336 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 8 g protein, Estimated glycemic load: 12 This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Vitamin B6, Folate, Iron, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Manganese.


Special Diet: Gluten Free, Vegetarian, Low Fat, High Protein, High Fibre, Low Calorie, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Soup

Submitted By: Maria Carr



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