Side Dishes

 

 

Herbed & Parmesan Asparagus Fries 

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Description:
Asparagus: This member of the lily family is one of the most nutritionally dense vegetable in existence. I mere five-ounce serving provides 60% of the recommended daily allowance of folate, which is necessary for blood cell formation, liver health and pregnant woman.

The health benefits of Asparagus are Vitamin B9 (folate), Potassium, Vitamin C, A B6 and B1. It also contains amino acids and works as a natural diuretic.

If you have picky eaters in your home? What about turning these amazing super veggies into healthy fries...they may never know how good they are for them!


Ingredients:
• 1 bunch asparagus [1lb], washed, ends snapped off + cut in half
• 1c coarse ground raw millet [about 3/4c of the way blended to flour]
• 1c raw millet flour [ground in blender]
• ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
• 1T dried oregano
• 2t dried basil
• 1t dried thyme
• 2t dried rosemary, finely chopped
• 3/4t garlic powder
• olive oil [to lightly spray before baking]
• s+p
• 1 egg white + 1 whole large egg [*or 2 flax eggs for vegan version]


Directions:
1. Preheat your oven to 400*
2. Line 1-2 baking sheets with foil, and place a wire rack [if oven safe] on top. Lightly coat with cooking spray.
3. Whisk eggs or flax "eggs" in a bowl that is big enough to dip the half spears.
4. On a plate or in a large bowl, mix millet flour + coarse ground millet together with the oregano, basil, thyme, rosemary + garlic powder. [salt + pepper will be sprinkled on before baking]
5. Dip the spears in the egg [whichever kind you're using] and let the excess drip off.
6. Roll in the millet + herb crumbs, then place on the wire rack. Repeat until all are coated.
7. Lightly spray the spears with olive oil and generously sprinkle salt + pepper on top. [If you can't spray the olive oil on, ever-so-gently brush it on with a pastry brush]
8. Bake for about 20min until golden brown. You can always give one a taste-test to determine if you want them to cook longer.
*Best if eaten right out of the oven.


Category: Side Dishes


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