Raw Foods

 

 

Raw Borscht Salad with Cashews Dressing 

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Description:
Good ol' Beets. So readily available and oh so good for you! They are loaded with vitamins and minerals and help both build the blood and detoxify it! It combines flavors that you will find very familiar if you've ever had traditional borscht soup. In this recipe you will enjoy celery root, carrot, green onions, beets (of course) and a creamy dressing made from soaked raw cashews, lemon, pepper and dried dill.
Beet roots contain unique phytonutrient pigments. Betacyanin is the red pigment found in red Beets and betaxanthin is the yellow pigment found in yellow Beets. Both of these pigments can provide powerful antioxidant protection. Beet roots are also particularly rich in folate, a B vitamin important for a healthy heart and essential for normal tissue growth. Although they are high on the glycemic index (contain lots of natural sugar and quickly rise our blood sugar levels) they are surprisingly low in calories. And, don’t throw out your beet greens – they are an extremely nutritious vegetable. They are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, which provide powerful antioxidant protection from oxidative damage to cellular structure and DNA. They, like the beet roots are rich in phytonutrients and are even richer in iron than spinach.



Ingredients:
2 cups grated celeriac (celery root)
2 cups grated carrots
2 cups grated red beet root
2 green onions, finely sliced on the bias

Dressing:

½ cup cashews
3 tablespoons water
Juice of 1 lemon
½ tsp. dill


Directions:
Finely grate the vegetables. Arrange on a large platter.
Blend dressing ingredients together and blend until smooth.
Drizzle onto the salad.


Special Diet: Vegetarian, High Fibre, Low Calorie


Category: Raw Foods

Submitted By: Sandra Butler



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