Dips

 

 

Artichokes with Dips 

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Description:
Artichoke is found in South Europe, North Africa, and the Canary Islands. Ancient Greeks and Romans used artichoke as a digestive aid. It may have health benefits on high cholesterol and indigestion.
Artichokes are nutrient dense and contain 16 essential nutrients. Yet, only 25 calories in a medium one! They provide magnesium, chromium, manganese, potassium, phosphorous, iron, calcium, fiber, Vitamin C and folate. They are low in calories and sodium, and have no fat and or cholesterol. As part of a low-fat, high-fiber diet, they help reduce the risk of certain types of heart disease, cancers and birth defects.
They are rich in manganese, which enhances thyroid function. Manganese helps the thyroid gland convert inactive thyroxine into active triiodothyronine, which boosts your metabolism and your mood.


Ingredients:
4 Large Artichokes and a Selection of Dips
See dip recipes below.


Directions:
Wash artichokes under cold running water. Cut off stems at base and remove small bottom leaves. Stand artichokes upright in deep saucepan large enough to hold snugly.

Add 1 teaspoon salt and two to three inches boiling water. (Lemon juice, herbs, garlic powder or onion powder may be added, if desired.)

Cover and boil gently 35 to 45 minutes or until base can be pierced easily with fork. (Add a little more boiling water, if needed.) Turn artichokes upside down to drain. Cool completely; cover and refrigerate to chill. Makes 4 artichokes.


CREAMY THAI DIP
¼ cup creamy peanut butter
¼ cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

Combine all ingredients; mix well. Makes ¾ cup.
Variation: For "Oriental Dip," omit peanut butter.

HONEY MUSTARD DIP
¼ cup prepared mustard
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey

Combine all ingredients; mix well. Makes ¾ cup.


Nutrient Information:
One serving size of artichoke is 56 g edible portion. One serving of artichoke contains 25 calories, 0 g of fat, 0 mg of cholesterol, 70 mg of sodium, 3 g of dietary fiber, 16 g of sugars, and 2 g of protein. It is also a source of calcium, iron and vitamins A, C. [A] Artichoke leaves was found to contain anti-hyperlipidemic sesquiterpenes and sesquiterpene glycosides..cynarin, 1,3 dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoylquinic acid, and scolymoside [1, 10]. These phenolic compounds are reported to have antimicrobial activties. [11]


Notes: Artichokes remain fairly constant in appearance for weeks, but flavor is adversely affected from the moment they are cut from the stalk. For maximum taste and tenderness, cook as soon as possible. Do not stock up on artichokes. Refrigerate unwashed, in a plastic bag, for up to 1 week.


Special Diet: Vegetarian, Low Sodium, Low Fat, High Fibre


Category: Dips

Submitted By: OK In Health



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