Diabetic

 

 

Blueberry-Pear Country Cobbler 

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Description:
Fruit is an important part of a healthy diet because it’s filled with vitamins and antioxidants, high in fibre, low in fat and calories, and delicious to boot. Here’s a recipe for a blueberry dessert that will bring some fresh fruit into your meal.

Ingredients:
Filling
3 tbsp (45 mL) sugar
1 tbsp (15 mL) cornstarch
¼ cup (60 mL) water
1 lb (450 g) fresh (or partially thawed frozen) blueberries
1 ripe medium pear, peeled, halved, cored, and diced
1 tbsp (15 mL) lemon zest

Topping
¾ cup (180 mL) white whole-wheat flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled
2 ½ tbsp (40 mL) sugar
1 tsp (5 mL) baking powder
½ cup (125 mL) fat-free buttermilk
2 tbsp (30 mL) canola oil
1 egg white
1 tsp (5 mL) lemon zest
¼ tsp (2 mL) ground cinnamon

Canola oil cooking spray


Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400° F/200° C.

2. Coat an 11 × 7-inch baking pan with canola oil cooking spray.

3. Combine sugar, cornstarch, and water in a large non-reactive saucepan. Stir until cornstarch is completely dissolved, then stir in berries and pears. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and boil 1 full minute. Remove from heat and stir in 1 tablespoon (15 mL) zest. Place fruit mixture in the baking pan.

4. Combine flour, 2 tablespoons (30 mL) of the sugar, and baking powder in a medium bowl. Combine buttermilk, canola oil, egg white, and remaining 1 teaspoon (5 mL) zest in a small bowl. Add buttermilk mixture to flour mixture and stir until just blended. Spoon batter into eight small mounds on top of the filling. Mix remaining sugar with cinnamon and sprinkle on top of cobbler.

Bake 20-25 minutes or until filling is bubbly and a wooden pick inserted into the topping comes out clean. Let stand 20 minutes to absorb flavors.

Serving size: ½ cup (125 mL)


Servings: 8


Nutrient Information:
per serving Calories: 165 g Total fat: 4.0 g Saturated fat: 0.3 g Trans fat: 0.0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 70 mg Carbohydrate: 31 g Fibre: 4 g Sugars: 17 g Protein: 3 g


Notes: Recipe courtesy of The Heart-Smart Diabetes Kitchen at the The Canadian Diabetes Association


Special Diet: High Fibre, Low Calorie, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Diabetic

Submitted By: OK In Health E-Magazine



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Description: What says summer more than cherries?
A fruit crisp offers the luscious flavor of a fresh fruit pie without the fuss of making a crust. Celebrate the arrival of cherries with this rich-tasting crisp. The nut-studded topping works great with other fruit combinations too.
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Anthocyanins give flowers, berries and other fruits the colors ranging from red to blue. Some of the best food sources of anthocyanins are red grapes, chokeberry, eggplant and, of course, cherries.
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