OK In Health - Naturopathic Corner

Vitamin D - April 2021

Winter Blues, Winter Flus: A simple explanation

By Dr. Tamara Browne, Penticton, BC

Vitimin D is know as the winter sunshine supplement - floers by a blind with sun peeping in

In northern climates vitamin D deficiency is common due to the fact that the sun’s rays are angled to such an extent that the UVB portion of these rays is filtered out. The UVB rays stimulate the biological production of active Vitamin D, D3. Although, in the summer a person produces about 20 000 IU of vitamin D in just 20 minutes, in the Canadian winter we produce virtually none, even if we do expose our skin to the sun (not likely!).

So how does this affect us?

Seemingly the effect is significant according to some recent research. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to a myriad of health problems which occur more routinely in the winter than any other season or which occur more readily in Northern climates in general.

For instance, viral and bacterial infections including the Flu occur more in the winter. It has been discovered that Vitamin D turns on genes that boost production of antimicrobial peptides called cathelicidins which destroy viruses, bacteria, and other germs.

Low vitamin D levels are also associated with an increased risk of cancer, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), osteoporosis, rickets, multiple sclerosis, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and obesity. In elderly people this deficiency is linked with weakness, an increased chance of developing macular degeneration, and a 2.5 times increased risk of death.

Testing is available to determine your Vitamin D status. Recommended supplemental intake during fall and winter is 1000-2000iu per day of vitamin D3. Dietary sources of active vitamin D are scarce and include some fatty fish (herring, salmon, sardines), fish liver oils, eggs from hens that have been fed vitamin D, and fortified milk and infant formulas. Other dairy products such as cheese and yogurt are not usually fortified with vitamin D.

 




Dr. Tamara BrowneDr. Tamara's Bio: Dr. Tamara Browne - Naturopathic Doctor. Dr. Browne graduated from Bastyr University of Naturopathic Medicine, Seattle, Wa., in 1996 and has had an active general family Naturopathic practice in the South Okanagan area ever since. Her current practice is called The Okanagan Chelation Center, and is located at 101-1040 Main Street Okanagan Falls BC, V0H 1R4. She specializes in heart disease prevention & treatment, Chelation & metal detoxification, vitamin & mineral injections, lab testing, pain management techniques, chronic disease management, prevention, nutrition, herbal medicine, constitutional homeopathy, weight loss, & women's health. To contact Dr. Browne - Ph. 250-497-6681. Dr. Browne has a column called ' Naturopathic Corner ' and has written for OK In Health since June 2009. - Dr. Tamara Browne Website - Email


Celtic Healings Intuitive Readings with Maria O'Farrell Carr

Copyright © 2004- 2011 OKinHealth.com. This article is of the copyright of OK in Health and the author; any reproduction, duplication and transmission of the article are to have prior written approval by OK in Health or the author.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
This information and research is intended to be reliable, but its accuracy cannot be guaranteed. All material in this article is provided for information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this newsletter / e-magazine / website. Readers should consult their doctor and other qualified health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being. The information and opinions provided in this newsletter / e-magazine/website are believed to be accurate and sound, based on the best judgment available to the authors. Readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries. The publisher is not responsible for any errors or omissions. OK in Health is not responsible for the information in these articles or for any content included in this article which is intended as a guide only and should not be used as a substitute to seeking professional advice from either your doctor or a registered specialist for yourself or anyone else.
Connect with Us
facebook    twitter

Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Wellness Tip
Breakfast Fast Food
Fast food breakfasts can be killers. According to our dietitian, some egg and sausage biscuit meals contain as many as 600 calories and 40 grams of fat! An English muffin with egg and Canadian bacon, although not "lite", is clearly a better option. It has about 385 calories and 20 grams of fat. In either case, try for balance in the rest of your day and week. Include plenty of fruit, vegetables and physical activity.


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Wellness Directory
Alexandra Goodall
Specialty: Art Therapy
Alexandra Goodall is a Visual Artist, Therapist, Facilitator and Coach. Approaches: Expressive Arts, Integrative Psychotherapy, Creative coaching/mentorship, Arts-based facilitation & workshops.
View Details


Vernon - Okanagan Women’s Expo - March 5 & 6, 2022


Event
Penticton - Okanagan Women’s Expo - Oct 23 & 24, 2021
Date: Oct 24, 2021
Location: Penticton & South Okanagan
Three annual Expos serving the Okanagan in Kelowna, Vernon and Penticton. Shop ‘til you drop!
View Details


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Article
Keeping Dessert in Your Gluten Free Diet
For so many people dessert is what they look forward to at the end of a meal. For some, the meal would not be complete without it. It need not be big or fancy; it just has to be a comforting sweetness at the end of a meal. Whatever your comfort dessert is, being gluten free does not mean you have to give it up...
Full Article


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Recipe
Roasted Butternut Squash Polenta with Fried Sage
Category: Vegetarian Entrees
Description: Roasting caramelizes the sugars and brings out the sweetness of the tender chunks of butternut squash that punctuate this golden yellow polenta casserole. It is finished off with the herbal overtones of butter-browned sage. We like this squash because it's easier to peel and cut compared with some squash. Marked by a tan exterior, the interior is a bright, rich orange. The butternut's flesh is less "stringy" than many squash making it perfect for purees and efficient cubes.

¦Butternut squash contains many vital poly-phenolic anti-oxidants and vitamins. Similar to other cucurbitaceae members, it is very low in calories; provides just 45 cal per 100 g. It contains no saturated fats or cholesterol; but is rich source of dietary fiber and phyto-nutrients. Squash is one of the common vegetable that is often recommended by dieticians in the cholesterol controlling and weight reduction programs.

¦It has more vitamin A than that in pumpkin. At 10630 IU per 100 g, it is perhaps the single vegetable source in the cucurbitaceae family with highest levels of vitamin-A, providing about 354% of RDA. Vitamin A is a powerful natural anti-oxidant and is required by body for maintaining the integrity of skin and mucus membranes. It is also an essential vitamin for vision. Research studies suggest that natural foods rich in vitamin A helps body protect against lung and oral cavity cancers.

¦Furthermore, butternut squash has plentiful of natural poly-phenolic flavonoid compounds like a and ß-carotenes, cryptoxanthin-ß, and lutein. These compounds convert to vitamin A inside the body and deliver same protective functions of vitamin A on the body.

¦It is rich in B-complex group of vitamins like folates, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamin, and pantothenic acid.

¦It has similar mineral profile as pumpkin, containing adequate levels of minerals like iron, zinc, copper, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus.

Full Recipe


Vernon - Okanagan Women’s Expo - March 5 & 6, 2022