OK In Health - Pass On the Salt

Comparison of Sodium in Foods - April 2021

What Sodium is in Your Food?

By 'PASS on the SALT'

No Salt or Low Salt diet

Last month, we look at "Taking it One Grain at a Time!".

I discussed how we thought we had a fairly good low sodium diet until my daughter had to start a low sodium renal diet. We rarely use salt when cooking or on the table and were feeling pretty proud of ourselves, it was only when she went to the paediatric renal dietician that we realized how much hidden sodium was actually in our foods.

This month we look at how much sodium is in our every day foods.

Are you trying to cut down on salt? It isn't the easiest thing to do if you are used to adding salt to everything to enhance the flavour. And the fact that many foods come pre-salted often doesn't help. This article sets forth some ways in which you can start your journey to a less salty cuisine and a healthier you.

These charts are an average amount of sodium. Read your labels as it will be your friend and watch the serving size too. 

 Protein

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

Bacon

1 medium slice

155

Chicken (dark meat)

3.5 oz roasted

87

Chicken (light meat)

3.5 oz roasted

77

Egg, fried

1 large

162

Egg, scrambled with milk

1 medium slice

171

Dried beans, peas or lentils

1 cup

4

Haddock

3 oz cooked

74

Halibut

3 oz cooked

59

Ham (roasted)

3.5 oz

1300-1500

Hamburger (lean)

3.5 oz broiled medium

77

Hot dog (beef)

1 medium

585

Peanuts, dry roasted

1 oz

228

Pork loin, roasted

3.5 oz

65

Roast lamb leg

3.5 oz

65

Roast veal leg

3.5 oz

68

Salmon

3 oz

50

Shellfish

3 oz

100 to 325

Shrimp

3 oz

190

Spareribs, braised

3.5 oz

93

Steak, T-bone

3.5 oz

66

Tuna, canned in spring water

3 oz chunk

300

Turkey, dark meat

3.5 roasted

76

Turkey, light meat

3.5 roasted

63

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dairy Products

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

American Cheese

1 oz

443

Buttermilk, salt added

1 cup

260

Cheddar cheese

1 oz

175

Cottage cheese, low fat

1 cup

918

Milk, whole

1 cup

120

Milk, skim or 1%

1 cup

125

Swiss cheese

1 oz

75

Yogurt, plain

1 cup

115

 

Vegetables and Vegetable Juice

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

Asparagus

6 spears

10

Avocado

1/2 medium

10

Beans, white, cooked

1 cup

4

Beans, green

1 cup

4

Beets

1 cup

84

Broccoli, raw

1/2 cup

12

Broccoli, cooked

1/2 cup

20

Carrot, raw

1 medium

25

Carrot, cooked

1/2 cup

52

Celery

1 stalk raw

35

Corn boiled, (sweet, no butter/salt)

1/2 cup

14

Cucumber

1/2 sliced

1

Eggplant, raw

1 cup

2

Eggplant, cooked

1 cup

4

Lettuce

1 leaf

2

Lima beans

1 cup

5

Mushrooms

1/2 cup (raw or cooked)

1-2

Mustard greens

1/2 chopped

12

Onions, chopped

1/2 cup (raw or cooked)

2-3

Peas

1 cup

4

Potato

1 baked

7

Radishes

10

11

Spinach, raw

1/2 cup

22

Spinach, cooked

1/2 cup

63

Squash, acorn

1/2 cup

4

Sweet potato

1 small

12

Tomato

1 small

11

Tomato juice, canned

3/4 cup

660

 

Fruits and Fruit Juices

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

Apple

1 medium

1

Apple juice

1 cup

7

Apricots

3 medium

1

Apricots (dried)

10 halves

3

Banana

1 medium

1

Cantaloupe

1/2 cup chopped

14

Dates

10 medium

2

Grapes

1 cup

2

Grape juice

1cup

7

Grapefruit

1 medium

0

Grapefruit juice

1 cup

3

Orange

1 medium

1

Orange juice

1 cup

2

Peach

1

0

Prunes

10

3

Raisins

1/3 cup

6

Strawberries

1 cup

2

Watermelon

1 cup

3

 

Breads and Grains

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

Bran flakes

3/4 cup

220

Bread, whole wheat

1 slice

159

Bread, white

1 slice

123

Bun, hamburger

1

241

Cooked cereal (instant)

1 packet

250

Corn flakes

1 cup

290

English muffin

1/2

182

Pancake

1 (7-inch round)

431

Rice, white long grain

1 cup cooked

4

Shredded wheat

1 biscuit

0

Spaghetti

1 cup

7

Waffle

1 frozen

235

 

Convenience Foods

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams/Sodium

Canned soups

1 cup

600-1,300

Canned and frozen main dishes

8 oz

500-2,570

Please note: These are sodium content ranges—the sodium content in certain food items may vary. Please contact your dietitian for specific product information.

READ Your Labels

Next month, we will look at some ideas for meal-time.




'PASS  on the SALT''PASS's Bio: Are you trying to cut down on salt? It isn't the easiest thing to do if you are used to adding salt to everything to enhance the flavour. And the fact that many foods come pre-salted often doesn't help. These 'Pass on The Salt' articles sets forth some ways in which you can start your journey to a less salty cuisine and a healthier you. Please contact your dietitian for specific information. These articles are only a guideline. - Email


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